D&I Report

Read our diversity and inclusion guidebook or go through our glossary of terms.

We are proud to present our first Diversity & Inclusion Report. As our team has grown over the years, we want to make sure we remain an open and inclusive company. We hope that our transparency in publishing this annual report will invoke change – both internally and within our industry at large.

Diversity and Inclusion

We believe that the future of our company is formed by the people in it. We want different people to feel like they can bring their entire selves to work and feel a sense of belonging. For us to set realistic goals for a more diverse work environment in the coming years, we feel it’s time to share an accurate image of the company's makeup as it is now.

To attract and retain a diverse group of people, we first need to focus on building an inclusive workspace. We don’t have the illusion that BB will ever be fully inclusive or diverse. There’s always room for improvement – in our company, the industry and our society at large. Every step forward uncovers new challenges and we’re trying to address them one step at a time. This report is a starting point for a longer trajectory, in which we will try to open up the conversation.

Survey

While we recognise that capturing data around self-identification is a daunting task, we didn’t want to skirt around certain sensitive questions by treating them like elephants in the room. This report presents the data we’ve gathered through an anonymous* demographic survey in 2018, which covered identity factors such as ethnicity, religion and gender identity. Our report includes only aggregated sets of data, meaning data appeared to us where 3+ people identified as a specific demographic. Being a small company, this means that we only have a general picture.

*The privacy and anonymity of our employees was our chief concern. Our report solely includes aggregated sets of data, meaning data appeared to us where 3+ people identified as a specific demographic. The collected data sets enable us to better understand the needs of everyone, but will never be used in a way which identifies individual beings

*13% of the employees did identify themselves as being in a leadership position in combination with another role. We were not able to identify these correlations due to privacy regulations, so this diagram shows the number of people who are solely fulfilling C-level roles.

What is your current role at the company?

Developer

47

%

Designer

20

%

Prefer not to answer

7

%

Leadership position

5

%

Writer

5

%

Admin

5

%

Other

4

%

*We don’t have official job levels at B&B, we asked our employees to indicate how they identify themselves within the company.

What do you consider to be. your current job level*?

Senior

36

%

Junior/Mid-level

31

%

Lead/Head of

16

%

Prefer not to answer

13

%

Intern/trainee

4

%

Job levels and roles are currently not clearly defined at B&B. We don’t like micromanaging and top to bottom hierarchies, nor do we like the idea of people getting stuck in pre-defined roles. We do, however, want to be transparent on who holds what position in what project and why. While it’s tempting to hide behind the idea of a structureless ‘flat-hierarchy’, effective forms of organising actually need a great deal of structure. We would like to identify these hidden layers and actively remove barriers which create challenges to grow. For us, building an open work environment is all about accountability, which might ask for more defined roles and job levels.

What gender do you identify as?

Cisgender man

56

%

Cisgender woman

33

%

Prefer not to answer

9

%

Non-conforming

2

%

Tech’s gender problem is nothing new. While there’s enough proof out there that gender diversity leads to increased productivity, greater innovation, and happier people, leadership around the world remains unbalanced, with women accounting for less than a quarter of management positions worldwide. Over the past three years, we’ve improved the gender balance of our company from 10/90 to 40/60. We’re aiming to make this at least 50/50 in the coming years. Naturally, this problem is not fixed by a clear-cut solution like hiring more women. It asks for a cultural change. One of the most obvious things we can do is making sure we are paying women the same as we pay men. The more challenging part is to actively support women’s careers and professional growth over time. This will be our primary focus for the coming years.

*In future surveys and articles, we’ll adopt the more inclusive term GSD: Gender and Sexual Diversity.

Do you identify as LGBTQIA+*?

Don't

76

%

Do

9

%

Prefer not to answer

13

%

While research has increasingly focused on gender diversity and inclusion in the workplace, issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) employees have received little attention. Differing from the majority in ways that are not immediately visible, LGBTQIA+ employees can choose whether, when and how they communicate their identity. Doing so can be very complicated and terrifying. We’re committed to creating an environment in which everyone feels safe to disclose – or not disclose – invisible sides of their identities in a way they feel comfortable with.

*This graph shows more than 100%, because we gave people the opportunity to select multiple identifiers.

What race/ethnicity do you identify as*?

European

80

%

Prefer not to answer

7

%

South-east Asian

5

%

Latin American

5

%

North American

4

%

Multi-ethnic/Bi-ethnic

4

%

Other

4

%

POC

2

%

Middle-eastern

2

%

Ethnic and racial minorities face many challenges in our predominantly white industry, including discrimination and unequal pay. Being a North-European company, our team members represent twenty-five – mostly European – nationalities. Across our three offices, different people with various cultural experiences interact with each other on a daily basis. This is part of our company fabric; it shapes our work and the ways we relate to each other. Diversity, however, is more complex than bringing people from all over the world together. It starts with the recognition of the existence of structural discrimination and its symptoms. We strive to acknowledge the advantages and obstacles of different people and aim to discover how to use measures to correct any imbalances.

What is your age?

21–34

21

%

35–44

15

%

18–24

9

%

Prefer not to answer

5

%

Most tech professionals are in their late twenties, our team is no exception. While a young culture has a tendency to attract young people, we strongly believe that having a certain age shouldn't be a requirement to work or participate in our company culture. As our team matures, we’re more actively working towards a hiring process that's inviting and friendly to people of all ages. Every life phase brings new opportunities and challenges, we would like to cater for them all.

What is your parental/carer status?

Parent/Carer

16

%

Not a parent/carer

80

%

Prefer not to answer

4

%

As our team grows, more people find themselves in caregiving positions. We want to make sure that everyone who has responsibility for the care and support of another person (whether that is a child, a partner, a parent, a relative or a friend), has the freedom to do so. We want to give everyone the time and space they need to have a life, a family, and a career. We're committed to align our policies on, for instance, paid parental leave across our offices, making sure people in every country get the same flexibility.

What is the highest level of schooling you have received?

College/Bachelors degree

35

%

Masters degree

31

%

Attended college, no degree

11

%

High/secondary school

9

%

Prefer not to answer

7

%

PhD

5

%

Other

2

%

We like to look at people beyond their education. We’re more interested in what they’ve experienced in life and how they approach and tackle complex problems. That doesn’t mean we don’t like to encourage a growth mindset. Our industry is constantly changing. Continuing education keeps us familiar with the latest developments, skills, and technologies in our field. Most of us work forty hours a week, throwing classes into our working lives isn’t easy. We are committed to supporting those who are completing school or doing extra-curricular education.

Do you identify as neuro-diverse, as having a genetic condition, or as having a disability?

No

80

%

Prefer not to answer

15

%

Do

4

%

Other

2

%

We differ from each other because of our characteristics. Some of these characteristics are visible, like our physical abilities. Others, however, are hidden under the surface, and not always easy to talk about. We believe a large part of creating an accessible workplace lies in creating openness and a mutual understanding of each other’s experiences. We want to be able to design and develop environments that provide great experiences for everyone – in the products we’re making, the company culture we’re building and the spaces we’re working in. Over the past years we worked hard on our comprehensive (mental) health coverage and flexible work environment, and over the next years, we hope to ensure that all of our offices and events are comfortable environments in which everyone can move around freely, both physically and mentally.

References

While compiling our survey, we adopted many questions from Culture Amp and Paradigm’s survey, and added additional ones by reading through Versett's diversity report and all the work Project Include has done. We also gathered many relevant insights from The Guardian and The Atlantic, NPR's Code Switch and the Littler Diversity & Inclusion Podcast.